In the field of research, this question is called Agree/Disagree (it is named after the answer options it uses). This type of question uses a voice, disagrees. Essentially, an agree, disagree scale is a series of response options that range from very favorable to strongly unfavorable. It allows respondents to answer more accurately and it offers you more nuanced survey responses for analysis. This kind of question has been very popular with polls for decades. What for? There are two main considerations in this discussion. First, Likert scales are arbitrary. The value assigned to a Likert element has no objective numerical basis, neither in terms of measurement theory, nor according to the scale (from which a distance measurement can be determined). For example, in 2014, the Scottish government wanted to ask, “Do you agree that Scotland should be an independent country?” The Election Commission considered this to be a key issue and recommended: “Should Scotland be an independent country?” A Likert scale (/ˈlɪk.pensart/LIK-scopic[1], but often misformulated /ˈlaɪ.kərt/LY-kərt[2]) is a psychometric scale that is often involved in research and uses questionnaires. This is the most common approach to the response scale in research, so the term (or more fully the Likert scale) is often used interchangeably with the rating scale, although there are other types of rating scales. A Likert scale is a very quick and easy realization of this type of survey that can be sent via all modes of communication. They offer a universal method of data collection, which means they are easy to understand.

If you`re working with quantitative data, it`s easy to draw conclusions, reports, results, and graphs from responses. While Likert-scale surveys are relatively simple, there is one big weakness you should keep in mind when interpreting your results: respondent biases. A Likert element is simply a statement that the interviewee is supposed to evaluate by giving it a quantitative value for any type of subjective or objective dimension, with the degree of correspondence/disagreement being the most used dimension. Well-designed Likert articles feature both “symmetry” and “balance.” Symmetry means that they contain the same number of positive and negative positions, whose respective distances are bilaterally symmetrical above the “neutral”/zero value (whether this value is presented as a candidate or not). Equilibrium means that the difference between the candidates` values is the same, so quantitative comparisons such as the average are valid for elements with more than two candidate values. [10] A good Likert scale, as above, shows a symmetry of categories around a centre with clearly defined language qualifications. In such a symmetric scale, equidistant attributes are usually observed more clearly or, at the very least, deduced. If a Likert scale is symmetrical and equidistant, it behaves more like a measure at regular intervals.

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